One year on, Nigeria on course towards polio eradication?

Since the detection of Wild Poliovirus (WPV) in Nigeria in 2016 for the first time in two years, Nigeria’s quest to be officially declared polio-free by the World Health Organisation (WHO) was truncated. Since the re-emergence of the polio virus in the country, Nigeria alongside Cameroon, Chad, Niger and Central African Republic have conducted several immunisation campaigns to halt the spread of the virus with focus on reaching every child with vaccines, and closing immunity gaps in populations that have previously been inaccessible.

Nigeria is one of only three countries in the world with ongoing wild poliovirus transmission, alongside Afghanistan and Pakistan no thanks to the circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) outbreaks. The last case was in Monguno Local Government Area (LGA), Borno state with onset of paralysis on 21st day of August 2016.

According to a report by Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI), a public-private partnership led by national governments with partners to eradicate polio globally, the total number of Wild Poliovirus (WPV1) cases for 2016 remains four and no cases have been reported in 2017

“Nigeria continues to implement an emergency response to the detected WPV1 strain and circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) strains affecting the country (last detected in 2016). Detection of polio cases in Nigeria underscores the risk posed by low-level undetected transmission and the urgent need to strengthen subnational surveillance. In Northeast Nigeria, an emergency response team continues to use the polio infrastructure to monitor the recent cholera outbreak. Women who are volunteer community mobilisers have been particularly crucial in the response, distributing posters and leading education sessions on the importance of basic hygiene to prevent the spread of bacteria,” the report revealed.

Nigeria may once again be taken off the list of polio-endemic countries and become certified polio free by WHO if it maintains a polio free status for 3 full years. So far, the Federal Government is working with religious, traditional and community leaders to dispel myths about vaccination of children. Cutting-edge technologies such as GPS satellite tracking is in use to obtain real-time contact tracing and daily mapping of identified chains of transmission.

Until poliovirus transmission is interrupted in Nigeria, Afghanistan and Pakistan, countries remain at risk of importation of polio, especially vulnerable countries with weak public health and immunization services and travel or trade links to endemic countries.

Polio is a crippling and potentially fatal infectious disease. Whilst polio can be prevented through immunization, it is critical for Nigeria to continue its effort to eradicate the disease for good.

A range of innovative strategies would be required to reach children in high-risk areas, including opportunistic campaigns that are run whenever security permits, market vaccination, cross-border points and outreach to nomads.

There is the need for Nigeria to strengthen its commitment to routine immunization programmes, continued vigilance on the part of surveillance and collaboration between government, partners, community leaders and health workers across the country. At the heart of this is the need for a  robust and resilient healthcare system.

A review of service delivery in Nigeria shows significant inequities in access to basic services with the poorest population quintiles and the rural dwellers significantly disadvantaged. Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria’s interventions deliberately target underserved segments such as the poor rural and urban communities, with a large concentration of the poor, hence addressing inequities in access to services in the country.

It will be recalled that World Polio Day was established by Rotary International over a decade ago to commemorate the birth of Jonas Salk, who led the first team to develop a vaccine against poliomyelitis. Use of this inactivated poliovirus vaccine and subsequent widespread use of the oral poliovirus, developed by Albert Sabin, led to the establishment of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) in 1988.

Promoting Hand Hygiene, Key in Achieving SDGs amidst Public Health Issues

The year, 2014 would not be forgotten in a hurry by Africans, including Nigerians, following the outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) which sent shock waves down the spines of everyone. It almost became a silent norm to avoid handshakes or stay away from people perceived to have symptoms such as fever, cough, etc. for fear of contacting the dreaded EVD. The imminent fear led campaigns from private and public institutions to promote the practice of hygiene.
Whilst personal hygiene was held in high esteem across the country, certain people capitalized on the health crisis to engage in the brisk business of hand sanitizers while the outbreak lasted. Two years since after the outbreak of EVD, the practice of promoting hand washing appears to have waned off. This practice has not only nosedived by the general population but also amongst healthcare providers.
The practice of hand washing is one of the most cost-effective investments in public health yet it is seldom practiced across all works of life despite its lifesaving potential. Given the impact of handwashing on health, nutrition, education, and equity, lack of investment in handwashing has important economic implications at the population level.
Research show that handwashing is particularly cost effective when compared to other interventions. For example, a $3.35 investment in handwashing promotion is estimated to deliver the same amount of health benefits as $11 investment in latrine construction, a $200 investment in household water supply, or an investment in immunizations, according to Global Handwashing Partnership, a coalition of international stakeholders who recognize hygiene as a pillar of international development and public health.
Although people wash their hands with water, very few wash their hands with soap at critical moments (for instance, after using the toilet, while cleaning a child, and before handling food). Although the lack of soap is not a significant barrier to handwashing at home, the use of soap is frequently for laundry, washing dishes and bathing is perceived as priority for soap use as opposed to handwashing.

The 2017 Global Handwashing Day theme “Our hands, our future!” reminds us that handwashing protects our own health, but also allows us to build our own futures, as well as those of our communities, and the world.

Because handwashing is an affordable, effective way to achieve these goals, by having the power to improve access to education for children, protect the health of patients and communities, and reduce inequities. It has an important role in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals—contributing to zero hunger, good health, quality education, reduced inequalities, and more.

Promoting the benefits and practice of handwashing with soap, as well as fostering access to and improving hygiene facilities, will help us work towards a future where that potential is realized. On the other hand, school programs can help establish lifelong healthy habits. Making toilets and handwashing stations available in schools is essential to ensure children’s access to school, especially for girls, and critical to students’ health and to reducing absenteeism.

ARC Nigeria broker States, Private sector Partnerships to strengthen vaccine cold chain infrastructure in Nigeria

Over the years, the state of Nigeria’s healthcare system has been characterized by sub-optimal maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes and poor quality of health services. Although the health system is laden with supply and demand side challenges, limited progress in health outcomes is primarily driven by the low coverage of key health interventions and limited availability of life saving commodities in service delivery points across the country.

As the Federal Government scales up access to underutilized and high-impact commodities, effective in-country supply chains has become an even more critical success factor in ensuring these commodities reach the women and children who need them most. There is however some concern, (given deficits in vital supply chain and management functions) that the public health supply chain system could impede efforts to improve coverage and improve health outcomes in Nigeria

 Pharm Azuka Okeke, Country Director, Africa Resource Centre (ARC) Nigeria

Despite marginal improvements and millions of dollars of supply chain investments by development partners and bilateral donors to address supply chain system challenges, Nigeria’s public health supply chain continues to be ineffective, inefficient, fragmented, and wasteful. Existing State and donor driven supply chain interventions are inadequate and necessitate bold, innovative approaches and complementary broad based partnerships to disrupt the cycle of poor public health supply chain performance.

To reverse this worrisome trend, Africa Resource Centre for Supply Chain in Nigeria (ARC Nigeria), an independent advisor and strategic partner founded by the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) is brokering States and Private sector partnerships to strengthen vaccine cold chain infrastructure in Nigeria.

Speaking at the Knowledge Sharing and Hackathon Workshop on Supply Chain organized by ARC Nigeria, in partnership with National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA) and Solina Group, which brought together over 80 Ministry of Health Directors and Immunization Managers from Borno, Sokoto, Osun, Kano, Kaduna, Katsina, Zamfara, Yobe and Niger states, Dr. Kayode Ogunniyi, Executive Secretary, Osun State Primary Healthcare Development Board, said that the survival of Nigeria as a nation depends on the quality of healthcare that is giving to children particularly the under-5 that constitute 20 percent of the total population.

According to Dr. Ogunniyi “Giving them the right vaccines at the right time is a strategy to secure their wellbeing. A robust knowledge of vaccine supply chain with a view to protecting vaccine integrity from the manufacturers to the administration to the child is a task that must be done. Thanks to National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA), ARC Nigeria and Solina for this initiative.

Dr. Samuel Jiya, Program Manager, Immunisation Vaccine and Logistics, Niger State, revealed that the workshop has created a platform that will strengthen Public-Private Partnerships in the Immunisation and Vaccine space in Nigeria.

“It has facilitated direct engagement of players in the Private sector and public wing. Personally, for Niger State, we have outlined our challenges and proffer new innovations in tackling them. Kudos to ARC Nigeria. Keep it up,” Dr. Jiya stated.

Sharing private sector engagement experience in healthcare, Trip Allport, Project Last Mile Delivery Lead, BMGF, disclosed that the Project Last Mile (PLM), which is an initiative of BMGF in partnership with Coca cola is an example of how the private sector is engaging with the public sector to develop an innovative solution with the aim of providing access to essential medicines and medical supplies in African.

““Project Last Mile, in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is proud to support Nigeria in strengthening the vaccine cold chain, tapping into the capabilities of The Coca-Cola Company and its bottling partner, the Nigerian Bottling Company (NBC)” Trip explained.

He continued: “By leveraging the local expertise and business partners of the Coca-Cola System in the country, we believe we can contribute to a marked improvement to maintaining a functional vaccine cold chain, meaning more children will have effective vaccines available at the point of care. Over the past couple of months, PLM has been developing the programme concept and framework with the National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA) at Federal level and plans to now pilot a new model of cold chain equipment maintenance at the State level with Lagos State in 2017/18, and if successful, will endeavor to expand this support to other states in Nigeria.”

L-R:  Mr. Lionel Pierre, Consultant to Project Last Mile, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation , Mr. Trip Allport, Project Last Mile Delivery Lead, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Mr. Rudi Lensley, CDE Director, Nigeria Bottling Company,

At the Supply Chain Workshop on Private-Public sector Collaboration organized by Africa Resource Centre for Supply Chain Nigeria in Kaduna for Ministry of Health Directors and Immunisation Managers in 10 states in Nigeria

The state of the health system in Nigeria is characterized by sub-optimal maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes, poor quality of health services, lack of protection from financial risk and a double burden of disease, with persistent vaccine preventable and communicable diseases and rising non communicable diseases. Although the health system is laden with supply and demand side challenges, the limited progress in health outcomes is primarily driven by the low coverage of key health interventions and limited availability of life saving commodities in service delivery points across the country.

Participants at the Knowledge Sharing and Hackathon Workshop in Kaduna

As the Government of Nigeria scales up access to underutilized and high-impact commodities, effective in-country supply chains become an even more critical success factor in ensuring these commodities reach the women and children who need them most. There is however some concern, (given deficits in vital supply chain and management functions) that the public health supply chain system could impede efforts to improve coverage and improve health outcomes in Nigeria

Despite some marginal improvements and millions of dollars of supply chain investments by USAID, Global Fund, GAVI, UNFPA, UNICEF, DFID, DFTAD, and other bilateral donors to address supply chain system challenges, Nigeria’s public health supply chain continues to be ineffective, inefficient, fragmented, and wasteful. Existing State and donor driven supply chain interventions are inadequate and necessitate bold innovative approaches and complementary broad based partnerships to disrupt the cycle of poor public health supply chain performance.

ARC Nigeria broker States, private sector partnerships to strengthen vaccine cold chain infrastructure in Nigeria

Ever since Edward Jenner demonstrated the value of immunization in 1792, vaccination has continued to remain a key strategy in the prevention and control of infectious diseases including preventable childhood diseases. Nigeria, with a population of over 170 million, has one of the highest under five mortality rates in the globe, with about 25% of these deaths preventable through routine immunization.

Despite marginal improvements and millions of dollars of supply chain investments by development partners and bilateral donors to address supply chain system challenges, Nigeria’s public health supply chain continues to be ineffective, inefficient, fragmented, and wasteful. Existing State and donor driven supply chain interventions are inadequate and necessitate bold innovative approaches and complementary broad based partnerships to disrupt the cycle of poor public health supply chain performance.

Whilst the Federal Government reinstates the need to provide immunization services and potent vaccines free to all population at risk as well as ensure equitable access, a 2016 NIC/MICS survey reveal the unavailability of vaccine stock across the states which has contributed to low immunization coverage. More worrisome is the fact that only 3 out of every 10 children are immunized in Nigeria while all Northern states in the country have immunization coverage below 50 percent.

A recent analysis show that weak cold chain infrastructure and inefficient vaccine distribution system is one of the 6 key immunization program challenges in Africa’s most populous nation.

To reverse this worrisome trend, Africa Resource Centre for Supply Chain in Nigeria (ARC Nigeria), an independent advisor and strategic partner founded by the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) is brokering States and Private sector partnerships to strengthen vaccine cold chain infrastructure in Nigeria.

Speaking at the Knowledge Sharing and Hackathon Workshop on Supply Chain organized by ARC Nigeria which brought together Ministry of Health Directors and Immunization Managers from Borno, Sokoto, Osun, Kano, Kaduna, Katsina, Zamfara, Yobe and Niger states, Dr. Kayode Ogunniyi, Executive Secretary, Osun State Primary Healthcare Development Board, said that the survival of Nigeria as a nation depends on the quality of healthcare that is giving to children particularly the under-5 that constitute 20 percent of the total population.

According to Dr. Ogunniyi “Giving them the right vaccines at the right time is a strategy to secure their wellbeing. A robust knowledge of vaccine supply chain with a view to protecting vaccine integrity from the manufacturers to the administration to the child is a task that must be done. Thanks to National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA), ARC Nigeria and Solina for this initiative.”
Dr. Samuel Jiya, Program Manager, Immunisation Vaccine and Logistics, Niger State, revealed that the workshop has created a platform that will strengthen Public-Private Partnerships in the Immunisation and Vaccine space in Nigeria.

“It has facilitated direct engagement of players in the Private sector and public wing. Personally, for Niger State, we have outlined our challenges and proffer new innovations in tackling them. Kudos to ARC Nigeria. Keep it up,” Dr. Jiya stated.

Sharing private sector engagement experience in healthcare, Trip Allport, Project Last Mile Delivery Lead, BMGF, disclosed that the Project Last Mile (PLM), in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is proud to support Nigeria in strengthening the vaccine cold chain, tapping into the capabilities of The Coca-Cola Company and its bottling partner, the Nigerian Bottling Company (NBC).

“By leveraging the local expertise and business partners of the Coca-Cola System in the country, we believe we can contribute to a marked improvement to maintaining a functional vaccine cold chain, meaning more children will have effective vaccines available at the point of care,” he said.

Source : Daily Post

Vaccine Cold Chain Infrastructure: ARC Nigeria Woo States, Private Sector

In order to reverse the worrisome trend of the state of Nigeria’s healthcare system which has been characterized by sub-optimal maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes and poor quality of health services, Africa Resource Centre for Supply Chain in Nigeria (ARC Nigeria), an independent advisor and strategic partner founded by the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) is brokering States and Private sector partnerships to strengthen vaccine cold chain infrastructure in Nigeria.

Speaking at the Knowledge Sharing and Hackathon Workshop on Supply Chain organized by ARC Nigeria, NPHCDA and Solina Group, which brought together over 80 Ministry of Health Directors and Immunization Managers from Borno, Sokoto, Osun, Kano, Kaduna, Katsina, Zamfara, Yobe and Niger states, Dr. Kayode Ogunniyi, Executive Secretary, Osun State Primary Healthcare Development Board, said that the survival of Nigeria as a nation depends on the quality of healthcare that is giving to children particularly the under-5 that constitute 20 percent of the total population.

According to Dr. Ogunniyi “Giving them the right vaccines at the right time is a strategy to secure their wellbeing. A robust knowledge of vaccine supply chain with a view to protecting vaccine integrity from the manufacturers to the administration to the child is a task that must be done. Thanks to National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA), ARC Nigeria and Solina for this initiative.

Dr. Samuel Jiya, Program Manager, Immunisation Vaccine and Logistics, Niger State, revealed that the workshop has created a platform that will strengthen Public-Private Partnerships in the Immunisation and Vaccine space in Nigeria.

“It has facilitated direct engagement of players in the Private sector and public wing. Personally, for Niger State, we have outlined our challenges and proffer new innovations in tackling them. Kudos to ARC Nigeria. Keep it up,” Dr. Jiya stated.

Sharing private sector engagement experience in healthcare, Trip Allport, Project Last Mile Delivery Lead, BMGF, disclosed that the Project Last Mile (PLM), which is an initiative of BMGF in partnership with Coca cola is an example of how the private sector is engaging with the public sector to develop an innovative solution with the aim of providing access to essential medicines and medical supplies in African.

“Project Last Mile, in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is proud to support Nigeria in strengthening the vaccine cold chain, tapping into the capabilities of The Coca-Cola Company and its bottling partner, the Nigerian Bottling Company (NBC). By leveraging the local expertise and business partners of the Coca-Cola System in the country, we believe we can contribute to a marked improvement to maintaining a functional vaccine cold chain, meaning more children will have effective vaccines available at the point of care. Over the past couple of months, PLM has been developing the programme concept and framework with the National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA) at Federal level and plans to now pilot a new model of cold chain equipment maintenance at the State level with Lagos State in 2017/18, and if successful, will endeavor to expand this support to other states in Nigeria.

Source : Leadership

ARC Nigeria broker states, private sector partnership to strengthen vaccine infrastructure

The Africa Resource Centre for Supply Chain in Nigeria (ARC Nigeria), an independent advisor and strategic partner, founded by Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is brokering states and private sector partnerships in strengthening the country’s vaccine cold chain infrastructure.

This is coming on the need to reverse the sub-optimal maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes and poor health service delivery in the country, according to a press statement made available to BusinessDay.

Speaking at the knowledge sharing and Hackathon Workshop on supply chain organized by ARC Nigeria, NPHCDA and Solina Group, Kayode Ogunniyi, executive secretary, Osun State Primary Healthcare Development Board, said that the survival of Nigeria as a nation depends on the quality of healthcare that is giving to children particularly the under-5 that constitute 20 percent of the total population.

“Giving them the right vaccines at the right time is a strategy to secure their wellbeing. A robust knowledge of vaccine supply chain with a view to protecting vaccine integrity from the manufacturers to the administration to the child is a task that must be done. Thanks to National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA), ARC Nigeria and Solina for this initiative,” Ogunniyi said.

According to experts, despite the marginal improvements and millions of dollars of supply chain investments by development partners and bilateral donors to address supply chain system challenges, Nigeria’s public health supply chain has continues to be ineffective, inefficient, fragmented, and wasteful.

The experts stated that the deficits in vital supply chain and management functions in the country’s public health supply could impede the government efforts to improve coverage and health outcomes in Nigeria.

Samuel Jiya, program manager, Immunisation Vaccine and Logistics, Niger State, revealed that the workshop has created a platform that will strengthen Public-Private Partnerships in the immunisation and vaccination space in the country.

“It has facilitated direct engagement of players in the private sector and public wing. Personally, for Niger State, we have outlined our challenges and proffer new innovations in tackling them,” Jiya said.

Sharing private sector engagement experience in healthcare, Trip Allport, Project Last Mile Delivery Lead, BMGF, disclosed that his organisation which is an initiative of BMGF in partnership with Coca cola is an example of how the private sector is engaging with the public sector to develop an innovative solution with the aim of providing access to essential medicines and medical supplies in African.

““PLMD in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is proud to support Nigeria in strengthening the vaccine cold chain, tapping into the capabilities of The Coca-Cola Company.

“By leveraging the local expertise and business partners of the Coca-Cola System in the country, we believe we can contribute to a marked improvement to maintaining a functional vaccine cold chain, meaning more children will have effective vaccines available at the point of care.

“Over the past couple of months, PLM has been developing the programme concept and framework with the NPHCDA at Federal level and plans to now pilot a new model of cold chain equipment maintenance at the State level with Lagos State in 2017/18, and if successful, will endeavor to expand this support to other states in Nigeria,” he said.

Source : Business Day

Vaccine Cold Chain Infrastructure: ARC Nigeria Woo States, Private Sector

In order to reverse the worrisome trend of the state of Nigeria’s healthcare system which has been characterized by sub-optimal maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes and poor quality of health services, Africa Resource Centre for Supply Chain in Nigeria (ARC Nigeria), an independent advisor and strategic partner founded by the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) is brokering States and Private sector partnerships to strengthen vaccine cold chain infrastructure in Nigeria.

Speaking at the Knowledge Sharing and Hackathon Workshop on Supply Chain organized by ARC Nigeria, NPHCDA and Solina Group, which brought together over 80 Ministry of Health Directors and Immunization Managers from Borno, Sokoto, Osun, Kano, Kaduna, Katsina, Zamfara, Yobe and Niger states, Dr. Kayode Ogunniyi, Executive Secretary, Osun State Primary Healthcare Development Board, said that the survival of Nigeria as a nation depends on the quality of healthcare that is giving to children particularly the under-5 that constitute 20 percent of the total population.
According to Dr. Ogunniyi “Giving them the right vaccines at the right time is a strategy to secure their wellbeing. A robust knowledge of vaccine supply chain with a view to protecting vaccine integrity from the manufacturers to the administration to the child is a task that must be done. Thanks to National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA), ARC Nigeria and Solina for this initiative.
Dr. Samuel Jiya, Program Manager, Immunisation Vaccine and Logistics, Niger State, revealed that the workshop has created a platform that will strengthen Public-Private Partnerships in the Immunisation and Vaccine space in Nigeria.
“It has facilitated direct engagement of players in the Private sector and public wing. Personally, for Niger State, we have outlined our challenges and proffer new innovations in tackling them. Kudos to ARC Nigeria. Keep it up,” Dr. Jiya stated.
Sharing private sector engagement experience in healthcare, Trip Allport, Project Last Mile Delivery Lead, BMGF, disclosed that the Project Last Mile (PLM), which is an initiative of BMGF in partnership with Coca cola is an example of how the private sector is engaging with the public sector to develop an innovative solution with the aim of providing access to essential medicines and medical supplies in African.

“Project Last Mile, in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is proud to support Nigeria in strengthening the vaccine cold chain, tapping into the capabilities of The Coca-Cola Company and its bottling partner, the Nigerian Bottling Company (NBC). By leveraging the local expertise and business partners of the Coca-Cola System in the country, we believe we can contribute to a marked improvement to maintaining a functional vaccine cold chain, meaning more children will have effective vaccines available at the point of care. Over the past couple of months, PLM has been developing the programme concept and framework with the National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA) at Federal level and plans to now pilot a new model of cold chain equipment maintenance at the State level with Lagos State in 2017/18, and if successful, will endeavor to expand this support to other states in Nigeria.

 

Source: NIGERIA TODAY

Private Sector Health Alliance honoured at NSE for global competence

The Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria, led by Alhaji Aliko Dangote, Mr. Jim Ovia, Dr. Muhammad Ali Pate, Mr. Aigboje Aig-Imoukhuede, Mrs. Sola David-Borha and other corporate business leaders, established to complement the Federal and State Government’s effort in accelerating improvement in health outcomes by leveraging private sector innovation, advocacy, impact investments and partnerships was honoured at the Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE) with the Nigeria Business Composite Award (NiBC 10) on the heels of an indigenous enterprise with global competence and maintaining a brilliant record and achievement.

The NIBC 10 is a selection of 10 successful Nigerian enterprises that have exhibited high potentials for growth and have over the years maintained a brilliant track record with the launch of the NiBC 10 bringing together top Nigerian CEOs and captains of industry.

According to The Nigerian Stock Exchange and Ciuci Consulting, organisers of the event, the Award celebrates companies that have exhibited huge growth potentials whilst inspiring confidence in the Nigerian society and its potential to produce thriving businesses.

Mr. Chukwuka Monye, Managing Partner of Ciuci Consulting said: “Nigerian entrepreneurs need to see examples of businessmen and women that are working hard and creating successful businesses in the same environment that many fear to explore. We have worked with each of the 10 companies, who are at different growth stages; and are pleased to recognise them and encourage them for what they do.”

Companies included in the NiBC 10 are House of Tara, Bestman Games, Iya Foods, L’Avyanna, Everyday Supermarkets, DBH Solutions, Ugo Monye Official, Healthcare Leadership Academy, Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria and Massey Street Children’s Hospital.

Since the launch of the Alliance, PHN has executed quick wins around four areas;

Innovation: The Alliance created the Nigerian Health Innovation Marketplace (NHIM) as a convergence platform to spur innovation, connect actors in the innovation eco-system, provide visibility to health innovations as well as build market and technical linkages.

Currently, over 800 innovators are registered on the NHIM virtual portal, 42 promising innovations have been curated; 71 percent of innovations are at pilot and scale-up phases; an estimated 700, 000 lives touched by curated innovations at peak; 8 deals brokered between actors in NHIM, and an estimated 200 jobs created by curated enterprises.

Partnerships: The Alliance has developed synergies between the needs of the health system and the capabilities of the private sector: and as a result, serves a multilayered constituency including the private sector in its multiple dimensions (e.g. private providers, PPMVs, corporate businesses), policy makers, NGOs, implementers, traditional institutions, State and Local government institutions, regulators and beneficiaries, particularly impacting women and children.

Various partnerships with both the public and private sector to improve health outcomes in Nigeria include Africa Resource Centre for Supply Chain in Nigeria (ARC Nigeria); Nigeria Healthcare Quality Initiative (NHQI); Malaria to Zero Initiative; Healthcare Leadership Academy and Maternal, Child and Health (MNCH) weeks.

Impact Investments: The Alliance has harnessed the collective voices and influence of private sector leaders to advocate for priority policy interventions and evidence based actions including:

  • Fiscal policy, regulatory and access to capital interventions that unlock the market potential of the private health sector.
  • Using State scorecards and other evidence based tools to hold government accountable, monitor and reward performance.
  • Innovative financing platforms such as Private Sector Roundtable on Ebola and Malaria to Zero Initiative to complement Government’s effort in achieving health goals.
  • Market shaping engagements that increase access to nutritious lifesaving commodities and services.

Impact Investment: The Alliance is facilitating high impact investments in four priority areas:

  • Unlocking the market potential of the health sector by addressing market failures, defragmenting the private sector and shaping health markets to create a more attractive health investment landscape.
  • Facilitating impact investments in the most promising innovative projects from the health innovation market place – to enable them to achieve scale and create jobs.
  • Originating and executing commercially viable investments in critical segments of the health sector that benefit undeserved segments.
  • Improving the quality of care in eligible facilities in the country.

Nigeria’s Healthcare Sector Requires Disruptive Innovative Approach- PHN

Nigeria’s healthcare sector has received billions in grants; however, the inadequacy of current health programs and stagnated results necessitates bold and disruptive innovative approaches to transform the sector.

The Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer of Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN) Dr. Muntaqa Umar-Sadiq, made the remark during a presentation at the just concluded Nigeria Innovation Summit (NIS) in Lagos, adding that the epidemiological transition and population growth projected in the country exacerbate the need for scalability of effective innovative approaches within the health sector.

He said that the state of health was characterised by poor outcomes, poor quality and a lack of protection from financial risk which attracted the interest of concerned Nigeria who set up PHN to  mobilizes private sector to complement government’s efforts in accelerating improvement in health outcomes by focusing on innovation, impact investments, advocacy and public-private partnerships.

Interventions by PHN, Dr. Umar-Sadiq said have saved at least one million lives of women and children in Nigeria.

“The sector requires innovations that address socio-economic challenges, such as poverty and health, also drive economic growth. In the 70s and 80s, Indonesia had a dependency ratio of about 86.84. Through several interventions focused on reducing the total fertility rate in the country, the dependency ratio reduced to 51.31 in 2010. It is expected that between 1980 and 2020, Indonesia’s dependency ratio will have reduced by 41%. Smaller dependency ratios increases the potential for economic growth (on average a 1 point reduction contributes 0.115% to economic growth). This is due to the fact that there is a higher percentage of the population in the workforce.

“Nigeria started out with a similar dependency ratio as Indonesia in the 1980s. However, our dependency ratio is projected to decrease by only 3% by 2020. This is because we have high infant and child mortality (69/1000 and 128/1000 respectively) and a high total fertility rate (6 children per woman). This limits the opportunity for economic growth. Health innovations centered around infant and child mortality as well as family planning could help Nigeria achieve the same results as Indonesia,” he said.

“Innovations from around the world have addressed similar health system challenges, leading to drastic improvement in quality, efficiency, accessibility and affordability of care.

Dr. Umar-Sadiq while charging startups present at the Summit to plug into the opportunities in the sector, added that, in recent times, a number of African countries have ridden a wave of locally appropriate innovations to accelerate progress in the health related MDGs.

“There has been little traction in harnessing these needed bold innovations in health for the Nigerian health market due to several constraints: visibility, capacity, fragmentation and lack of data.

He made case for startups in the healthcare system, stating that they require visibility; “visibility increases awareness of promising new innovations and approaches to address health challenges. Investors have little visibility on compelling viable health innovations.

“Poor capacity and support system for health innovators – they lack access to capital, business and financial management and basic business startup support / incubation needed to take ideas through to market. Investors and health innovators lack the convergence platforms that create market and technical linkages as well as COPs and scalable platforms for sustainable impact and limited evidence based knowledge products and data to facilitates the development and dissemination of focused insights and new evidence about innovations and their strategies to scale and replicate”.

He said that PHN’s theory of change requires rethinking the way health sector partnerships and innovations are curated for impact. The Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN) led by business leaders in Nigeria including Alhaji Aliko Dangote therefore embraces the need to focus on mobilizing the private sector to advance health outcomes through innovation and partnerships.

The Private Sector Health Alliance led a coalition of partners to create the Nigeria Health Innovation Marketplace (NHIM) focuses on four inter-related core objectives: Identify promising innovations; incubate and create linkages that will enable scale; convergence platform around health innovation and invest for impact in selected opportunities.

NHIM covers a plethora of components including a health innovaton hub, an accelerator program and healthcare challenges and has since curated over 42 innovations through the business development boot camp representing four archetypes of healthcare innovations.

The Nigeria Innovation Summit, a brainchild of Emerging Media, also attracted participants delegates from the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria; Anambra State Government; Kaduna State; Ministry of Industry, Trade and Investment; UNIDO/NIRP; Oxford Business Group; British High Commission; University of Lagos; Federal University of Technology, Owerri; Caleb University; Crescent University; Nasarawa State University; Nuhu Bamalli Polytechnic, Zaria, amongst others.

We must ensure Innovations in the Health Sector address Real Problems – Umar-Sadiq

The Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN), a non-profit organization has a sustainable platform that combines the strengths of the corporate private sector in Nigeria to partner with government. For the past five years they have been in operation, they have set up the Nigerian Health Innovation Marketplace that has incubated over 40 health innovations, forged private sector partnerships with over 20 states in Nigeria, reached millions of women and children with life-saving commodities by leveraging the excess utility of the corporate private sector and deployed significant impact investments in the health sector. With all these they have demonstrated that this model is a viable tool for addressing the continent’s biggest health challenges.

In an interview with Outrepreneurs at the just concluded Nigeria Innovation Summit, the MD/CEO and founding board member of the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria, Dr. Muntaqa Umar-Sadiq said the alliance is a private sector led platform, created by business leaders in Nigeria, including Jim Ovia, Alhaji Aliko Dangote, Aigboje Aig-Imoukhuede, and corporates like Stanbic IBTC Bank, GlaxoSmithKline and Coca-Cola who have come together to create an all-encompassing platform to pool their respective private sector capabilities, resources and expertise to complement government in accelerating improvement in achieving the health sustainable development goals (SDGs)

“The health sector is characterized by suboptimal health outcomes, poor quality of care, and the lack of protection from financial risks. In Nigeria, we have a very complex, dynamic and iterative healthcare system with lots of supply and demand side challenges. We lose nearly a million women and children every year to preventable causes. There are lot of basic issues like malaria, pneumonia and HIV affecting them. Malnutrition, for example, accounts for nearly 50% of the deaths of children under the age of five. Our maternal, infant and neonatal mortality rate is still high compared to other comparable countries so there is a lot to do. But our view is that the private sector has an important role to play in leveraging some of its capabilities and expertise to complement government in addressing these challenges.”

Umar-Sadiq thinks there are several types of innovations prevalent in the health sector today, but the most useful ones have to address real problems in the sector. “The first is that we need to ensure that the innovations address a pre-identified problem. The second is that these innovations are content specific, and third is that they are sustainable. The sort of innovations that are coming up are product innovations, technology innovations, thought innovations, service delivery innovations and manufacturing innovations. I think that the complementarity of these innovations will create the sort of sources of disruption that we need to begin to reach the low level health equilibrium that we have in the health sector.”

PHN’s work is focused on innovation, as they seek to create and scale up the Nigerian Health Innovation Marketplace to identify, nurture and scale up disruptive innovation that can contribute to the government’s ‘Saving a Million Lives Initiative’. The alliance seeks to develop synergies between the needs of the health system and the capabilities of the private sector through partnerships for better mobile health infrastructure, supply chain capabilities and several other needs of the sector. They also help to mobilize the private sector resources to undertake impact investments in the underserved segments of the health sector.



Read more: https://outrepreneurs.com/2017/09/we-must-ensure-innovations-in-the-health-sector-address-real-problems-umar-sadiq/#ixzz4tJYu7CAZ