Muntaqa Umar-sadiq, CEO of Private Sector Health Alliance, is Eisenhower 2018 Fellow

 

A Nigerian, Muntaqa Umar-sadiq, CEO of the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria, has been announced a 2018 Eisenhower Innovation Fellow – the only Nigerian selected as part of 23 ascendant global leaders from around the world who will embark on a leadership journey across the United States to engage in transformative exchanges of ideas with leading innovators in their fields; and bring action-oriented solutions back to their countries.

The 23 Eisenhower Innovation Fellows are acknowledged by their outstanding and unique achievements in their various fields and are creative visionaries and disruptors who are working to make the world a better place.

Recognizing his pioneering work in developing the Nigeria Health Innovation Marketplace (NHIM) and fostering public private partnerships to shape health markets; alongside business and public sector leaders in Nigeria, including Mr. Aliko Dangote, President/CEO, Dangote group; Dr. Muhammad Ali Pate; Mr. Jim Ovia, chairman, Zenith Bank; Mr. Aig Imoukhuede, President, Nigerian Stock Exchange; Mr. Herbert Wigwe, CEO, Access bank, Muntaqa’s Eisenhower fellowship will focus on models to scale up gains from the NHIM and integrate an impact investment fund aimed at accelerating early stage health innovations; and investing in exemplary financially viable health innovation ecosystems that serve the health poor and underserved in Nigeria.
 
Eisenhower Fellowships Chairman and former U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates, in a statement said that the Eisenhower Fellows will apply what they learn from their peers and in their engagements with experts in their respective fields to maximize their potential and produce sustained impact long after their fellowships are completed. “We welcome these exceptional global leaders into the dynamic global network of Eisenhower Fellows around the world who are working to enhance international understanding and generate a positive impact in their countries,” said Gates. “This remarkable group of change agents is committed to solving some of the most pressing global issues of our day,” said George de Lama, president of Eisenhower Fellowships.
 
Muntaqa is currently the CEO of the Private Sector Health Alliance, and was the Senior Technical Advisor to the former Minister of State for Health in Nigeria. He commenced his career as a healthcare M & A investment banker at Morgan Stanley in the UK where he focused on the Healthcare & Pharmaceutical sector. He is a graduate of the University of Cambridge, England and Imperial College School of Medicine in London, and also a holder of Chartered Alternatives Investment Analyst (CAIAI) charter. Muntaqa was also honored as a 2016 World Economic Forum (WEF) Young Global Leader (YGL)
 

NCDC, PHN Partner with Private Sector Towards Ending Epidemics in Nigeria

Lagos, Nigeria The Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) and the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN), have launched a new initiative – the Alliance for Epidemic Preparedness and Response (A4EPR). The aim is to develop a formal structure for the private sector to support the Nigerian government through NCDC, in the prevention, preparedness, detection, response and control of outbreaks in Nigeria.

The A4EPR is designed to address priority areas in health security, focusing on building the capacity to protect the health of Nigerians. These priority areas include – purchase of equipment for outbreak preparedness and response; support to States during outbreaks; advocacy and communications as well as capacity development.

The launch of A4EPR by the Honourable Minister of Health, Professor Isaac Adewole took place at a Private Sector Roundtable on Health Security in Lagos State. The event had the Honourable Minister of State for Health, Lagos State Commissioner for Health and over fifty representatives from private sector organisations in Nigeria. The roundtable was also an opportunity for government officials and the private sector to discuss public-private partnerships in building resilient health systems to advance the country’s emergency preparedness and response to disease threats.

The recent outbreaks of Lassa fever, Monkeypox, yellow fever, cholera and meningitis have caused significant strain to the nation’s public health sector. In addition to this, these outbreaks affect the country’s economy through loss of labour, reduced productivity and inefficiency of businesses.

The Honourable Minister of Health Professor Isaac Adewole while launching the A4EPR emphasised that the Federal Ministry of Health is very proud of the initiative and expressed commitment to support the alliance. He cited three key lessons from the 2014 Ebola outbreak response in Nigeria including strong partnership between State and Federal Governments, public-private partnerships and effective team work.

The event also had a panel discussion with representatives from Dangote Foundation, Total E&P, MTN Foundation, Tony Elumelu Foundation, Facebook and the Lagos State Commissioner for Health. Each panellist shared their organisation’s experience as part of the 2014 Ebola outbreak response and other outbreak response activities, highlighting recommendations and areas for future collaboration.

In describing the efforts to develop an initiative as A4EPR, the CEO of NCDC, Dr. Chikwe Ihekweazu and his counterpart at PHN, Dr. Muntaqa Umar-Sadiq expressed their optimism that will serve as a secure and sustainable platform for public-private partnerships in Nigeria’s health sector.

In the next year, A4EPR will work towards securing commitments from the private sector to achieve its objectives.

For more information, contact:

Alexander Chiejina, chiejina@pshan.org
Jeremiah Agenyi, jeremiah.agenyi@ncdc.gov.ng

Signed:
Dr. Chikwe Ihekweazu
CEO NCDC

Signed:
Dr. Muntaqa Umar-Sadiq
CEO PHN

Source : Relief Web, NCDC

Private sector collaboration critical in public healthcare, says ARC Nigeria

With the world ranking showing that Nigeria under performs global and regional peers on key levers of logistics and supply chain efficiency, Africa Resource Centre for Supply Chain, a collaboration of Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria and Bill &Melinda Gates Foundation, are calling for private sector collaboration in Nigeria to strengthen public health supply chain especially in availability of vaccines, essential medicines, and medical products.

 

From Left: CEO, Private |Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria, Dr. Muntaqa Umar-Sadiq, Global Solution Director, UPS Foundation,Jim Coughlan, Regional Director, ARC, Azuka Okeke, Founder & Director MIT, Prof Jarrod Goentzel, Humanitarin Supply Chain Lab, MIT, USA, Brownny Timm, at the maiden ARC Partnership Forum in Lagos, Nigeria recently.

Speaking during a maiden ARC Partnership Forum in Lagos last week, CEO, Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria, Dr. Muntaqa Umar-Sadiq revealed that the private sector has the expertise, resources, and capabilities that the public health sector can benefit from to increase availability of medicines, health commodities and effective and resilient supply chain systems.

According to Muntaqa, the impact ARC aims to achieve is an improved performance of the supply chains to increase availability of medicines health commodities and collectively, the private sector possesses both tangible & intangible assets that give it a distinct advantage in tackling specific health issues, including building resilient supply chain systems.

On his part, the Regional Director, ARC, Azuka Okeke revealed that ARC Nigeria is currently working to build a centralized and regional Supply Chain Resource Centre that can provide independent advice, develop partnerships and share experiences and learning across countries to help Ministries of Health meet their public health goals.

Okeke noted that ARC is focusing on areas that collectively leverage supply chain expertise, tools and capabilities to support performance improvements in the public health system. “These areas include supporting supply chain strategy, advocate for supply chain investments and provide independent advice and expertise; support Ministries of Health to shape investments and align donors and implementing partners; access private sector expertise, tools, methods and capability to improve supply chain transformations and supply chain management as well as broker partnerships to strengthen Ministries of Health capability and build long-term talent for supply chain in Africa,” Azuka explained.

In his views, Global Solutions Director, UPS Foundation, Jim Coughlan pointed out that the biggest opportunity is finding ways to engage the private sector given their knowledge level or intellectual capital in supply chain management. He explained that UPS and Global Alliance for Vaccine and Immunisation, GAVI, worked together on a programme called Strategic Training for Executive Programme, STEP, which is currently running in Nigeria.

Also speaking, a Supply chain consultant to the office of the Minister of Health, Pharm Gloria Chukwuma noted that efficient and effective supply chain management remained an important key to the healthcare system as it improves availability of medical commodities which is a key enabler for optimal health care service delivery.

The ARC Partnership forum brought together corporate private sector partners from Pharmaceuticals, FMCGs, Logistics & Transport, Telecommunications, etc. including government and development partners with an aim of sharing experiences, and exploring new ways of partnering with the public sector to achieve measurable results in healthcare. Also, the forum brought to the fore how private sector is strengthening public health supply chain.

Source : Vanguard Nigeria

Dangote partners Jim Ovia, others to salvage Nigeria’s healthcare system

Business moguls under the aegis of the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN) have partnered with the Federal Government to improve the health sector by leveraging innovation, advocacy, investment and partnership to support the ‘Save One Million Lives’ initiative.

The Chairman of Dangote Group, Aliko Dangote; Chairman of Zenith Bank, Jim Ovia; former Managing Director of Access Bank, Aig-Aigboje Imoukhuede; and other business leaders are intensifying efforts to salvage the country’s ailing healthcare system.

During the presentation of certificate to innovators who have recorded major feat in the area of health yesterday in Lagos, Ovia said PHN was set up as a private sector-led coalition to complement government efforts in the Save One Million Lives Initiative (SOML) and mobilise the private sector through a coordinated platform to improve health outcomes through innovation and partnerships.

Former President Goodluck Jonathan inaugurated the SOML as an elaborate scheme to expand access to essential primary health care services for women and children in 2015.
Ovia said that some progress has been recorded and current rates show a reduction in maternal and child mortality, adding, in order to see considerable improvement in the health sector; there was the need to rethink the way its challenges are addressed.

“The vibrant and fast growing private corporate sector in Nigeria with its business techniques, innovative approaches, influence, resources, capabilities and advocacy platforms can be greatly beneficial to the health system if harnessed strategically and aligned to government’s priorities.

Initially, I doubted that one million lives are lost due to preventable diseases, but I thank the innovators that came up with the idea and we will continue to make sure that more lives are saved. The idea is to disrupt the old ways of doing things with new, accessible and affordable methods,” he added.

Chief Executive Officer PHN, Dr. Muntaqa Umar-Sadiq said: “Many have donated but we have not seen the commensurate result. We will not continue to do things the same way. We have to rethink. We engaged the business community to come together to focus on innovation, partnership, advocacy and impact investment.”

Source : Guardian

ARC Nigeria broker States, private sector partnerships to strengthen vaccine cold chain infrastructure in Nigeria

Ever since Edward Jenner demonstrated the value of immunization in 1792, vaccination has continued to remain a key strategy in the prevention and control of infectious diseases including preventable childhood diseases. Nigeria, with a population of over 170 million, has one of the highest under five mortality rates in the globe, with about 25% of these deaths preventable through routine immunization.

Despite marginal improvements and millions of dollars of supply chain investments by development partners and bilateral donors to address supply chain system challenges, Nigeria’s public health supply chain continues to be ineffective, inefficient, fragmented, and wasteful. Existing State and donor driven supply chain interventions are inadequate and necessitate bold innovative approaches and complementary broad based partnerships to disrupt the cycle of poor public health supply chain performance.

Whilst the Federal Government reinstates the need to provide immunization services and potent vaccines free to all population at risk as well as ensure equitable access, a 2016 NIC/MICS survey reveal the unavailability of vaccine stock across the states which has contributed to low immunization coverage. More worrisome is the fact that only 3 out of every 10 children are immunized in Nigeria while all Northern states in the country have immunization coverage below 50 percent.

A recent analysis show that weak cold chain infrastructure and inefficient vaccine distribution system is one of the 6 key immunization program challenges in Africa’s most populous nation.

To reverse this worrisome trend, Africa Resource Centre for Supply Chain in Nigeria (ARC Nigeria), an independent advisor and strategic partner founded by the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) is brokering States and Private sector partnerships to strengthen vaccine cold chain infrastructure in Nigeria.

Speaking at the Knowledge Sharing and Hackathon Workshop on Supply Chain organized by ARC Nigeria which brought together Ministry of Health Directors and Immunization Managers from Borno, Sokoto, Osun, Kano, Kaduna, Katsina, Zamfara, Yobe and Niger states, Dr. Kayode Ogunniyi, Executive Secretary, Osun State Primary Healthcare Development Board, said that the survival of Nigeria as a nation depends on the quality of healthcare that is giving to children particularly the under-5 that constitute 20 percent of the total population.

According to Dr. Ogunniyi “Giving them the right vaccines at the right time is a strategy to secure their wellbeing. A robust knowledge of vaccine supply chain with a view to protecting vaccine integrity from the manufacturers to the administration to the child is a task that must be done. Thanks to National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA), ARC Nigeria and Solina for this initiative.”
Dr. Samuel Jiya, Program Manager, Immunisation Vaccine and Logistics, Niger State, revealed that the workshop has created a platform that will strengthen Public-Private Partnerships in the Immunisation and Vaccine space in Nigeria.

“It has facilitated direct engagement of players in the Private sector and public wing. Personally, for Niger State, we have outlined our challenges and proffer new innovations in tackling them. Kudos to ARC Nigeria. Keep it up,” Dr. Jiya stated.

Sharing private sector engagement experience in healthcare, Trip Allport, Project Last Mile Delivery Lead, BMGF, disclosed that the Project Last Mile (PLM), in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is proud to support Nigeria in strengthening the vaccine cold chain, tapping into the capabilities of The Coca-Cola Company and its bottling partner, the Nigerian Bottling Company (NBC).

“By leveraging the local expertise and business partners of the Coca-Cola System in the country, we believe we can contribute to a marked improvement to maintaining a functional vaccine cold chain, meaning more children will have effective vaccines available at the point of care,” he said.

Source : Daily Post

Vaccine Cold Chain Infrastructure: ARC Nigeria Woo States, Private Sector

In order to reverse the worrisome trend of the state of Nigeria’s healthcare system which has been characterized by sub-optimal maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes and poor quality of health services, Africa Resource Centre for Supply Chain in Nigeria (ARC Nigeria), an independent advisor and strategic partner founded by the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) is brokering States and Private sector partnerships to strengthen vaccine cold chain infrastructure in Nigeria.

Speaking at the Knowledge Sharing and Hackathon Workshop on Supply Chain organized by ARC Nigeria, NPHCDA and Solina Group, which brought together over 80 Ministry of Health Directors and Immunization Managers from Borno, Sokoto, Osun, Kano, Kaduna, Katsina, Zamfara, Yobe and Niger states, Dr. Kayode Ogunniyi, Executive Secretary, Osun State Primary Healthcare Development Board, said that the survival of Nigeria as a nation depends on the quality of healthcare that is giving to children particularly the under-5 that constitute 20 percent of the total population.

According to Dr. Ogunniyi “Giving them the right vaccines at the right time is a strategy to secure their wellbeing. A robust knowledge of vaccine supply chain with a view to protecting vaccine integrity from the manufacturers to the administration to the child is a task that must be done. Thanks to National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA), ARC Nigeria and Solina for this initiative.

Dr. Samuel Jiya, Program Manager, Immunisation Vaccine and Logistics, Niger State, revealed that the workshop has created a platform that will strengthen Public-Private Partnerships in the Immunisation and Vaccine space in Nigeria.

“It has facilitated direct engagement of players in the Private sector and public wing. Personally, for Niger State, we have outlined our challenges and proffer new innovations in tackling them. Kudos to ARC Nigeria. Keep it up,” Dr. Jiya stated.

Sharing private sector engagement experience in healthcare, Trip Allport, Project Last Mile Delivery Lead, BMGF, disclosed that the Project Last Mile (PLM), which is an initiative of BMGF in partnership with Coca cola is an example of how the private sector is engaging with the public sector to develop an innovative solution with the aim of providing access to essential medicines and medical supplies in African.

“Project Last Mile, in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is proud to support Nigeria in strengthening the vaccine cold chain, tapping into the capabilities of The Coca-Cola Company and its bottling partner, the Nigerian Bottling Company (NBC). By leveraging the local expertise and business partners of the Coca-Cola System in the country, we believe we can contribute to a marked improvement to maintaining a functional vaccine cold chain, meaning more children will have effective vaccines available at the point of care. Over the past couple of months, PLM has been developing the programme concept and framework with the National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA) at Federal level and plans to now pilot a new model of cold chain equipment maintenance at the State level with Lagos State in 2017/18, and if successful, will endeavor to expand this support to other states in Nigeria.

Source : Leadership

ARC Nigeria broker states, private sector partnership to strengthen vaccine infrastructure

The Africa Resource Centre for Supply Chain in Nigeria (ARC Nigeria), an independent advisor and strategic partner, founded by Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is brokering states and private sector partnerships in strengthening the country’s vaccine cold chain infrastructure.

This is coming on the need to reverse the sub-optimal maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes and poor health service delivery in the country, according to a press statement made available to BusinessDay.

Speaking at the knowledge sharing and Hackathon Workshop on supply chain organized by ARC Nigeria, NPHCDA and Solina Group, Kayode Ogunniyi, executive secretary, Osun State Primary Healthcare Development Board, said that the survival of Nigeria as a nation depends on the quality of healthcare that is giving to children particularly the under-5 that constitute 20 percent of the total population.

“Giving them the right vaccines at the right time is a strategy to secure their wellbeing. A robust knowledge of vaccine supply chain with a view to protecting vaccine integrity from the manufacturers to the administration to the child is a task that must be done. Thanks to National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA), ARC Nigeria and Solina for this initiative,” Ogunniyi said.

According to experts, despite the marginal improvements and millions of dollars of supply chain investments by development partners and bilateral donors to address supply chain system challenges, Nigeria’s public health supply chain has continues to be ineffective, inefficient, fragmented, and wasteful.

The experts stated that the deficits in vital supply chain and management functions in the country’s public health supply could impede the government efforts to improve coverage and health outcomes in Nigeria.

Samuel Jiya, program manager, Immunisation Vaccine and Logistics, Niger State, revealed that the workshop has created a platform that will strengthen Public-Private Partnerships in the immunisation and vaccination space in the country.

“It has facilitated direct engagement of players in the private sector and public wing. Personally, for Niger State, we have outlined our challenges and proffer new innovations in tackling them,” Jiya said.

Sharing private sector engagement experience in healthcare, Trip Allport, Project Last Mile Delivery Lead, BMGF, disclosed that his organisation which is an initiative of BMGF in partnership with Coca cola is an example of how the private sector is engaging with the public sector to develop an innovative solution with the aim of providing access to essential medicines and medical supplies in African.

““PLMD in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is proud to support Nigeria in strengthening the vaccine cold chain, tapping into the capabilities of The Coca-Cola Company.

“By leveraging the local expertise and business partners of the Coca-Cola System in the country, we believe we can contribute to a marked improvement to maintaining a functional vaccine cold chain, meaning more children will have effective vaccines available at the point of care.

“Over the past couple of months, PLM has been developing the programme concept and framework with the NPHCDA at Federal level and plans to now pilot a new model of cold chain equipment maintenance at the State level with Lagos State in 2017/18, and if successful, will endeavor to expand this support to other states in Nigeria,” he said.

Source : Business Day

Vaccine Cold Chain Infrastructure: ARC Nigeria Woo States, Private Sector

In order to reverse the worrisome trend of the state of Nigeria’s healthcare system which has been characterized by sub-optimal maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes and poor quality of health services, Africa Resource Centre for Supply Chain in Nigeria (ARC Nigeria), an independent advisor and strategic partner founded by the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) is brokering States and Private sector partnerships to strengthen vaccine cold chain infrastructure in Nigeria.

Speaking at the Knowledge Sharing and Hackathon Workshop on Supply Chain organized by ARC Nigeria, NPHCDA and Solina Group, which brought together over 80 Ministry of Health Directors and Immunization Managers from Borno, Sokoto, Osun, Kano, Kaduna, Katsina, Zamfara, Yobe and Niger states, Dr. Kayode Ogunniyi, Executive Secretary, Osun State Primary Healthcare Development Board, said that the survival of Nigeria as a nation depends on the quality of healthcare that is giving to children particularly the under-5 that constitute 20 percent of the total population.
According to Dr. Ogunniyi “Giving them the right vaccines at the right time is a strategy to secure their wellbeing. A robust knowledge of vaccine supply chain with a view to protecting vaccine integrity from the manufacturers to the administration to the child is a task that must be done. Thanks to National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA), ARC Nigeria and Solina for this initiative.
Dr. Samuel Jiya, Program Manager, Immunisation Vaccine and Logistics, Niger State, revealed that the workshop has created a platform that will strengthen Public-Private Partnerships in the Immunisation and Vaccine space in Nigeria.
“It has facilitated direct engagement of players in the Private sector and public wing. Personally, for Niger State, we have outlined our challenges and proffer new innovations in tackling them. Kudos to ARC Nigeria. Keep it up,” Dr. Jiya stated.
Sharing private sector engagement experience in healthcare, Trip Allport, Project Last Mile Delivery Lead, BMGF, disclosed that the Project Last Mile (PLM), which is an initiative of BMGF in partnership with Coca cola is an example of how the private sector is engaging with the public sector to develop an innovative solution with the aim of providing access to essential medicines and medical supplies in African.

“Project Last Mile, in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is proud to support Nigeria in strengthening the vaccine cold chain, tapping into the capabilities of The Coca-Cola Company and its bottling partner, the Nigerian Bottling Company (NBC). By leveraging the local expertise and business partners of the Coca-Cola System in the country, we believe we can contribute to a marked improvement to maintaining a functional vaccine cold chain, meaning more children will have effective vaccines available at the point of care. Over the past couple of months, PLM has been developing the programme concept and framework with the National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA) at Federal level and plans to now pilot a new model of cold chain equipment maintenance at the State level with Lagos State in 2017/18, and if successful, will endeavor to expand this support to other states in Nigeria.

 

Source: NIGERIA TODAY

Nigeria’s Healthcare Sector Requires Disruptive Innovative Approach- PHN

Nigeria’s healthcare sector has received billions in grants; however, the inadequacy of current health programs and stagnated results necessitates bold and disruptive innovative approaches to transform the sector.

The Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer of Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN) Dr. Muntaqa Umar-Sadiq, made the remark during a presentation at the just concluded Nigeria Innovation Summit (NIS) in Lagos, adding that the epidemiological transition and population growth projected in the country exacerbate the need for scalability of effective innovative approaches within the health sector.

He said that the state of health was characterised by poor outcomes, poor quality and a lack of protection from financial risk which attracted the interest of concerned Nigeria who set up PHN to  mobilizes private sector to complement government’s efforts in accelerating improvement in health outcomes by focusing on innovation, impact investments, advocacy and public-private partnerships.

Interventions by PHN, Dr. Umar-Sadiq said have saved at least one million lives of women and children in Nigeria.

“The sector requires innovations that address socio-economic challenges, such as poverty and health, also drive economic growth. In the 70s and 80s, Indonesia had a dependency ratio of about 86.84. Through several interventions focused on reducing the total fertility rate in the country, the dependency ratio reduced to 51.31 in 2010. It is expected that between 1980 and 2020, Indonesia’s dependency ratio will have reduced by 41%. Smaller dependency ratios increases the potential for economic growth (on average a 1 point reduction contributes 0.115% to economic growth). This is due to the fact that there is a higher percentage of the population in the workforce.

“Nigeria started out with a similar dependency ratio as Indonesia in the 1980s. However, our dependency ratio is projected to decrease by only 3% by 2020. This is because we have high infant and child mortality (69/1000 and 128/1000 respectively) and a high total fertility rate (6 children per woman). This limits the opportunity for economic growth. Health innovations centered around infant and child mortality as well as family planning could help Nigeria achieve the same results as Indonesia,” he said.

“Innovations from around the world have addressed similar health system challenges, leading to drastic improvement in quality, efficiency, accessibility and affordability of care.

Dr. Umar-Sadiq while charging startups present at the Summit to plug into the opportunities in the sector, added that, in recent times, a number of African countries have ridden a wave of locally appropriate innovations to accelerate progress in the health related MDGs.

“There has been little traction in harnessing these needed bold innovations in health for the Nigerian health market due to several constraints: visibility, capacity, fragmentation and lack of data.

He made case for startups in the healthcare system, stating that they require visibility; “visibility increases awareness of promising new innovations and approaches to address health challenges. Investors have little visibility on compelling viable health innovations.

“Poor capacity and support system for health innovators – they lack access to capital, business and financial management and basic business startup support / incubation needed to take ideas through to market. Investors and health innovators lack the convergence platforms that create market and technical linkages as well as COPs and scalable platforms for sustainable impact and limited evidence based knowledge products and data to facilitates the development and dissemination of focused insights and new evidence about innovations and their strategies to scale and replicate”.

He said that PHN’s theory of change requires rethinking the way health sector partnerships and innovations are curated for impact. The Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN) led by business leaders in Nigeria including Alhaji Aliko Dangote therefore embraces the need to focus on mobilizing the private sector to advance health outcomes through innovation and partnerships.

The Private Sector Health Alliance led a coalition of partners to create the Nigeria Health Innovation Marketplace (NHIM) focuses on four inter-related core objectives: Identify promising innovations; incubate and create linkages that will enable scale; convergence platform around health innovation and invest for impact in selected opportunities.

NHIM covers a plethora of components including a health innovaton hub, an accelerator program and healthcare challenges and has since curated over 42 innovations through the business development boot camp representing four archetypes of healthcare innovations.

The Nigeria Innovation Summit, a brainchild of Emerging Media, also attracted participants delegates from the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria; Anambra State Government; Kaduna State; Ministry of Industry, Trade and Investment; UNIDO/NIRP; Oxford Business Group; British High Commission; University of Lagos; Federal University of Technology, Owerri; Caleb University; Crescent University; Nasarawa State University; Nuhu Bamalli Polytechnic, Zaria, amongst others.

We must ensure Innovations in the Health Sector address Real Problems – Umar-Sadiq

The Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN), a non-profit organization has a sustainable platform that combines the strengths of the corporate private sector in Nigeria to partner with government. For the past five years they have been in operation, they have set up the Nigerian Health Innovation Marketplace that has incubated over 40 health innovations, forged private sector partnerships with over 20 states in Nigeria, reached millions of women and children with life-saving commodities by leveraging the excess utility of the corporate private sector and deployed significant impact investments in the health sector. With all these they have demonstrated that this model is a viable tool for addressing the continent’s biggest health challenges.

In an interview with Outrepreneurs at the just concluded Nigeria Innovation Summit, the MD/CEO and founding board member of the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria, Dr. Muntaqa Umar-Sadiq said the alliance is a private sector led platform, created by business leaders in Nigeria, including Jim Ovia, Alhaji Aliko Dangote, Aigboje Aig-Imoukhuede, and corporates like Stanbic IBTC Bank, GlaxoSmithKline and Coca-Cola who have come together to create an all-encompassing platform to pool their respective private sector capabilities, resources and expertise to complement government in accelerating improvement in achieving the health sustainable development goals (SDGs)

“The health sector is characterized by suboptimal health outcomes, poor quality of care, and the lack of protection from financial risks. In Nigeria, we have a very complex, dynamic and iterative healthcare system with lots of supply and demand side challenges. We lose nearly a million women and children every year to preventable causes. There are lot of basic issues like malaria, pneumonia and HIV affecting them. Malnutrition, for example, accounts for nearly 50% of the deaths of children under the age of five. Our maternal, infant and neonatal mortality rate is still high compared to other comparable countries so there is a lot to do. But our view is that the private sector has an important role to play in leveraging some of its capabilities and expertise to complement government in addressing these challenges.”

Umar-Sadiq thinks there are several types of innovations prevalent in the health sector today, but the most useful ones have to address real problems in the sector. “The first is that we need to ensure that the innovations address a pre-identified problem. The second is that these innovations are content specific, and third is that they are sustainable. The sort of innovations that are coming up are product innovations, technology innovations, thought innovations, service delivery innovations and manufacturing innovations. I think that the complementarity of these innovations will create the sort of sources of disruption that we need to begin to reach the low level health equilibrium that we have in the health sector.”

PHN’s work is focused on innovation, as they seek to create and scale up the Nigerian Health Innovation Marketplace to identify, nurture and scale up disruptive innovation that can contribute to the government’s ‘Saving a Million Lives Initiative’. The alliance seeks to develop synergies between the needs of the health system and the capabilities of the private sector through partnerships for better mobile health infrastructure, supply chain capabilities and several other needs of the sector. They also help to mobilize the private sector resources to undertake impact investments in the underserved segments of the health sector.



Read more: https://outrepreneurs.com/2017/09/we-must-ensure-innovations-in-the-health-sector-address-real-problems-umar-sadiq/#ixzz4tJYu7CAZ