ARC Nigeria broker States, private sector partnerships to strengthen vaccine cold chain infrastructure in Nigeria

Ever since Edward Jenner demonstrated the value of immunization in 1792, vaccination has continued to remain a key strategy in the prevention and control of infectious diseases including preventable childhood diseases. Nigeria, with a population of over 170 million, has one of the highest under five mortality rates in the globe, with about 25% of these deaths preventable through routine immunization.

Despite marginal improvements and millions of dollars of supply chain investments by development partners and bilateral donors to address supply chain system challenges, Nigeria’s public health supply chain continues to be ineffective, inefficient, fragmented, and wasteful. Existing State and donor driven supply chain interventions are inadequate and necessitate bold innovative approaches and complementary broad based partnerships to disrupt the cycle of poor public health supply chain performance.

Whilst the Federal Government reinstates the need to provide immunization services and potent vaccines free to all population at risk as well as ensure equitable access, a 2016 NIC/MICS survey reveal the unavailability of vaccine stock across the states which has contributed to low immunization coverage. More worrisome is the fact that only 3 out of every 10 children are immunized in Nigeria while all Northern states in the country have immunization coverage below 50 percent.

A recent analysis show that weak cold chain infrastructure and inefficient vaccine distribution system is one of the 6 key immunization program challenges in Africa’s most populous nation.

To reverse this worrisome trend, Africa Resource Centre for Supply Chain in Nigeria (ARC Nigeria), an independent advisor and strategic partner founded by the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) is brokering States and Private sector partnerships to strengthen vaccine cold chain infrastructure in Nigeria.

Speaking at the Knowledge Sharing and Hackathon Workshop on Supply Chain organized by ARC Nigeria which brought together Ministry of Health Directors and Immunization Managers from Borno, Sokoto, Osun, Kano, Kaduna, Katsina, Zamfara, Yobe and Niger states, Dr. Kayode Ogunniyi, Executive Secretary, Osun State Primary Healthcare Development Board, said that the survival of Nigeria as a nation depends on the quality of healthcare that is giving to children particularly the under-5 that constitute 20 percent of the total population.

According to Dr. Ogunniyi “Giving them the right vaccines at the right time is a strategy to secure their wellbeing. A robust knowledge of vaccine supply chain with a view to protecting vaccine integrity from the manufacturers to the administration to the child is a task that must be done. Thanks to National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA), ARC Nigeria and Solina for this initiative.”
Dr. Samuel Jiya, Program Manager, Immunisation Vaccine and Logistics, Niger State, revealed that the workshop has created a platform that will strengthen Public-Private Partnerships in the Immunisation and Vaccine space in Nigeria.

“It has facilitated direct engagement of players in the Private sector and public wing. Personally, for Niger State, we have outlined our challenges and proffer new innovations in tackling them. Kudos to ARC Nigeria. Keep it up,” Dr. Jiya stated.

Sharing private sector engagement experience in healthcare, Trip Allport, Project Last Mile Delivery Lead, BMGF, disclosed that the Project Last Mile (PLM), in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is proud to support Nigeria in strengthening the vaccine cold chain, tapping into the capabilities of The Coca-Cola Company and its bottling partner, the Nigerian Bottling Company (NBC).

“By leveraging the local expertise and business partners of the Coca-Cola System in the country, we believe we can contribute to a marked improvement to maintaining a functional vaccine cold chain, meaning more children will have effective vaccines available at the point of care,” he said.

Source : Daily Post

Vaccine Cold Chain Infrastructure: ARC Nigeria Woo States, Private Sector

In order to reverse the worrisome trend of the state of Nigeria’s healthcare system which has been characterized by sub-optimal maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes and poor quality of health services, Africa Resource Centre for Supply Chain in Nigeria (ARC Nigeria), an independent advisor and strategic partner founded by the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) is brokering States and Private sector partnerships to strengthen vaccine cold chain infrastructure in Nigeria.

Speaking at the Knowledge Sharing and Hackathon Workshop on Supply Chain organized by ARC Nigeria, NPHCDA and Solina Group, which brought together over 80 Ministry of Health Directors and Immunization Managers from Borno, Sokoto, Osun, Kano, Kaduna, Katsina, Zamfara, Yobe and Niger states, Dr. Kayode Ogunniyi, Executive Secretary, Osun State Primary Healthcare Development Board, said that the survival of Nigeria as a nation depends on the quality of healthcare that is giving to children particularly the under-5 that constitute 20 percent of the total population.

According to Dr. Ogunniyi “Giving them the right vaccines at the right time is a strategy to secure their wellbeing. A robust knowledge of vaccine supply chain with a view to protecting vaccine integrity from the manufacturers to the administration to the child is a task that must be done. Thanks to National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA), ARC Nigeria and Solina for this initiative.

Dr. Samuel Jiya, Program Manager, Immunisation Vaccine and Logistics, Niger State, revealed that the workshop has created a platform that will strengthen Public-Private Partnerships in the Immunisation and Vaccine space in Nigeria.

“It has facilitated direct engagement of players in the Private sector and public wing. Personally, for Niger State, we have outlined our challenges and proffer new innovations in tackling them. Kudos to ARC Nigeria. Keep it up,” Dr. Jiya stated.

Sharing private sector engagement experience in healthcare, Trip Allport, Project Last Mile Delivery Lead, BMGF, disclosed that the Project Last Mile (PLM), which is an initiative of BMGF in partnership with Coca cola is an example of how the private sector is engaging with the public sector to develop an innovative solution with the aim of providing access to essential medicines and medical supplies in African.

“Project Last Mile, in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is proud to support Nigeria in strengthening the vaccine cold chain, tapping into the capabilities of The Coca-Cola Company and its bottling partner, the Nigerian Bottling Company (NBC). By leveraging the local expertise and business partners of the Coca-Cola System in the country, we believe we can contribute to a marked improvement to maintaining a functional vaccine cold chain, meaning more children will have effective vaccines available at the point of care. Over the past couple of months, PLM has been developing the programme concept and framework with the National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA) at Federal level and plans to now pilot a new model of cold chain equipment maintenance at the State level with Lagos State in 2017/18, and if successful, will endeavor to expand this support to other states in Nigeria.

Source : Leadership

ARC Nigeria broker states, private sector partnership to strengthen vaccine infrastructure

The Africa Resource Centre for Supply Chain in Nigeria (ARC Nigeria), an independent advisor and strategic partner, founded by Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is brokering states and private sector partnerships in strengthening the country’s vaccine cold chain infrastructure.

This is coming on the need to reverse the sub-optimal maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes and poor health service delivery in the country, according to a press statement made available to BusinessDay.

Speaking at the knowledge sharing and Hackathon Workshop on supply chain organized by ARC Nigeria, NPHCDA and Solina Group, Kayode Ogunniyi, executive secretary, Osun State Primary Healthcare Development Board, said that the survival of Nigeria as a nation depends on the quality of healthcare that is giving to children particularly the under-5 that constitute 20 percent of the total population.

“Giving them the right vaccines at the right time is a strategy to secure their wellbeing. A robust knowledge of vaccine supply chain with a view to protecting vaccine integrity from the manufacturers to the administration to the child is a task that must be done. Thanks to National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA), ARC Nigeria and Solina for this initiative,” Ogunniyi said.

According to experts, despite the marginal improvements and millions of dollars of supply chain investments by development partners and bilateral donors to address supply chain system challenges, Nigeria’s public health supply chain has continues to be ineffective, inefficient, fragmented, and wasteful.

The experts stated that the deficits in vital supply chain and management functions in the country’s public health supply could impede the government efforts to improve coverage and health outcomes in Nigeria.

Samuel Jiya, program manager, Immunisation Vaccine and Logistics, Niger State, revealed that the workshop has created a platform that will strengthen Public-Private Partnerships in the immunisation and vaccination space in the country.

“It has facilitated direct engagement of players in the private sector and public wing. Personally, for Niger State, we have outlined our challenges and proffer new innovations in tackling them,” Jiya said.

Sharing private sector engagement experience in healthcare, Trip Allport, Project Last Mile Delivery Lead, BMGF, disclosed that his organisation which is an initiative of BMGF in partnership with Coca cola is an example of how the private sector is engaging with the public sector to develop an innovative solution with the aim of providing access to essential medicines and medical supplies in African.

““PLMD in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is proud to support Nigeria in strengthening the vaccine cold chain, tapping into the capabilities of The Coca-Cola Company.

“By leveraging the local expertise and business partners of the Coca-Cola System in the country, we believe we can contribute to a marked improvement to maintaining a functional vaccine cold chain, meaning more children will have effective vaccines available at the point of care.

“Over the past couple of months, PLM has been developing the programme concept and framework with the NPHCDA at Federal level and plans to now pilot a new model of cold chain equipment maintenance at the State level with Lagos State in 2017/18, and if successful, will endeavor to expand this support to other states in Nigeria,” he said.

Source : Business Day

Vaccine Cold Chain Infrastructure: ARC Nigeria Woo States, Private Sector

In order to reverse the worrisome trend of the state of Nigeria’s healthcare system which has been characterized by sub-optimal maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes and poor quality of health services, Africa Resource Centre for Supply Chain in Nigeria (ARC Nigeria), an independent advisor and strategic partner founded by the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) is brokering States and Private sector partnerships to strengthen vaccine cold chain infrastructure in Nigeria.

Speaking at the Knowledge Sharing and Hackathon Workshop on Supply Chain organized by ARC Nigeria, NPHCDA and Solina Group, which brought together over 80 Ministry of Health Directors and Immunization Managers from Borno, Sokoto, Osun, Kano, Kaduna, Katsina, Zamfara, Yobe and Niger states, Dr. Kayode Ogunniyi, Executive Secretary, Osun State Primary Healthcare Development Board, said that the survival of Nigeria as a nation depends on the quality of healthcare that is giving to children particularly the under-5 that constitute 20 percent of the total population.
According to Dr. Ogunniyi “Giving them the right vaccines at the right time is a strategy to secure their wellbeing. A robust knowledge of vaccine supply chain with a view to protecting vaccine integrity from the manufacturers to the administration to the child is a task that must be done. Thanks to National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA), ARC Nigeria and Solina for this initiative.
Dr. Samuel Jiya, Program Manager, Immunisation Vaccine and Logistics, Niger State, revealed that the workshop has created a platform that will strengthen Public-Private Partnerships in the Immunisation and Vaccine space in Nigeria.
“It has facilitated direct engagement of players in the Private sector and public wing. Personally, for Niger State, we have outlined our challenges and proffer new innovations in tackling them. Kudos to ARC Nigeria. Keep it up,” Dr. Jiya stated.
Sharing private sector engagement experience in healthcare, Trip Allport, Project Last Mile Delivery Lead, BMGF, disclosed that the Project Last Mile (PLM), which is an initiative of BMGF in partnership with Coca cola is an example of how the private sector is engaging with the public sector to develop an innovative solution with the aim of providing access to essential medicines and medical supplies in African.

“Project Last Mile, in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is proud to support Nigeria in strengthening the vaccine cold chain, tapping into the capabilities of The Coca-Cola Company and its bottling partner, the Nigerian Bottling Company (NBC). By leveraging the local expertise and business partners of the Coca-Cola System in the country, we believe we can contribute to a marked improvement to maintaining a functional vaccine cold chain, meaning more children will have effective vaccines available at the point of care. Over the past couple of months, PLM has been developing the programme concept and framework with the National Primary Healthcare Development Agency (NPHCDA) at Federal level and plans to now pilot a new model of cold chain equipment maintenance at the State level with Lagos State in 2017/18, and if successful, will endeavor to expand this support to other states in Nigeria.

 

Source: NIGERIA TODAY

Nigeria’s Healthcare Sector Requires Disruptive Innovative Approach- PHN

Nigeria’s healthcare sector has received billions in grants; however, the inadequacy of current health programs and stagnated results necessitates bold and disruptive innovative approaches to transform the sector.

The Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer of Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN) Dr. Muntaqa Umar-Sadiq, made the remark during a presentation at the just concluded Nigeria Innovation Summit (NIS) in Lagos, adding that the epidemiological transition and population growth projected in the country exacerbate the need for scalability of effective innovative approaches within the health sector.

He said that the state of health was characterised by poor outcomes, poor quality and a lack of protection from financial risk which attracted the interest of concerned Nigeria who set up PHN to  mobilizes private sector to complement government’s efforts in accelerating improvement in health outcomes by focusing on innovation, impact investments, advocacy and public-private partnerships.

Interventions by PHN, Dr. Umar-Sadiq said have saved at least one million lives of women and children in Nigeria.

“The sector requires innovations that address socio-economic challenges, such as poverty and health, also drive economic growth. In the 70s and 80s, Indonesia had a dependency ratio of about 86.84. Through several interventions focused on reducing the total fertility rate in the country, the dependency ratio reduced to 51.31 in 2010. It is expected that between 1980 and 2020, Indonesia’s dependency ratio will have reduced by 41%. Smaller dependency ratios increases the potential for economic growth (on average a 1 point reduction contributes 0.115% to economic growth). This is due to the fact that there is a higher percentage of the population in the workforce.

“Nigeria started out with a similar dependency ratio as Indonesia in the 1980s. However, our dependency ratio is projected to decrease by only 3% by 2020. This is because we have high infant and child mortality (69/1000 and 128/1000 respectively) and a high total fertility rate (6 children per woman). This limits the opportunity for economic growth. Health innovations centered around infant and child mortality as well as family planning could help Nigeria achieve the same results as Indonesia,” he said.

“Innovations from around the world have addressed similar health system challenges, leading to drastic improvement in quality, efficiency, accessibility and affordability of care.

Dr. Umar-Sadiq while charging startups present at the Summit to plug into the opportunities in the sector, added that, in recent times, a number of African countries have ridden a wave of locally appropriate innovations to accelerate progress in the health related MDGs.

“There has been little traction in harnessing these needed bold innovations in health for the Nigerian health market due to several constraints: visibility, capacity, fragmentation and lack of data.

He made case for startups in the healthcare system, stating that they require visibility; “visibility increases awareness of promising new innovations and approaches to address health challenges. Investors have little visibility on compelling viable health innovations.

“Poor capacity and support system for health innovators – they lack access to capital, business and financial management and basic business startup support / incubation needed to take ideas through to market. Investors and health innovators lack the convergence platforms that create market and technical linkages as well as COPs and scalable platforms for sustainable impact and limited evidence based knowledge products and data to facilitates the development and dissemination of focused insights and new evidence about innovations and their strategies to scale and replicate”.

He said that PHN’s theory of change requires rethinking the way health sector partnerships and innovations are curated for impact. The Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN) led by business leaders in Nigeria including Alhaji Aliko Dangote therefore embraces the need to focus on mobilizing the private sector to advance health outcomes through innovation and partnerships.

The Private Sector Health Alliance led a coalition of partners to create the Nigeria Health Innovation Marketplace (NHIM) focuses on four inter-related core objectives: Identify promising innovations; incubate and create linkages that will enable scale; convergence platform around health innovation and invest for impact in selected opportunities.

NHIM covers a plethora of components including a health innovaton hub, an accelerator program and healthcare challenges and has since curated over 42 innovations through the business development boot camp representing four archetypes of healthcare innovations.

The Nigeria Innovation Summit, a brainchild of Emerging Media, also attracted participants delegates from the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria; Anambra State Government; Kaduna State; Ministry of Industry, Trade and Investment; UNIDO/NIRP; Oxford Business Group; British High Commission; University of Lagos; Federal University of Technology, Owerri; Caleb University; Crescent University; Nasarawa State University; Nuhu Bamalli Polytechnic, Zaria, amongst others.

We must ensure Innovations in the Health Sector address Real Problems – Umar-Sadiq

The Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN), a non-profit organization has a sustainable platform that combines the strengths of the corporate private sector in Nigeria to partner with government. For the past five years they have been in operation, they have set up the Nigerian Health Innovation Marketplace that has incubated over 40 health innovations, forged private sector partnerships with over 20 states in Nigeria, reached millions of women and children with life-saving commodities by leveraging the excess utility of the corporate private sector and deployed significant impact investments in the health sector. With all these they have demonstrated that this model is a viable tool for addressing the continent’s biggest health challenges.

In an interview with Outrepreneurs at the just concluded Nigeria Innovation Summit, the MD/CEO and founding board member of the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria, Dr. Muntaqa Umar-Sadiq said the alliance is a private sector led platform, created by business leaders in Nigeria, including Jim Ovia, Alhaji Aliko Dangote, Aigboje Aig-Imoukhuede, and corporates like Stanbic IBTC Bank, GlaxoSmithKline and Coca-Cola who have come together to create an all-encompassing platform to pool their respective private sector capabilities, resources and expertise to complement government in accelerating improvement in achieving the health sustainable development goals (SDGs)

“The health sector is characterized by suboptimal health outcomes, poor quality of care, and the lack of protection from financial risks. In Nigeria, we have a very complex, dynamic and iterative healthcare system with lots of supply and demand side challenges. We lose nearly a million women and children every year to preventable causes. There are lot of basic issues like malaria, pneumonia and HIV affecting them. Malnutrition, for example, accounts for nearly 50% of the deaths of children under the age of five. Our maternal, infant and neonatal mortality rate is still high compared to other comparable countries so there is a lot to do. But our view is that the private sector has an important role to play in leveraging some of its capabilities and expertise to complement government in addressing these challenges.”

Umar-Sadiq thinks there are several types of innovations prevalent in the health sector today, but the most useful ones have to address real problems in the sector. “The first is that we need to ensure that the innovations address a pre-identified problem. The second is that these innovations are content specific, and third is that they are sustainable. The sort of innovations that are coming up are product innovations, technology innovations, thought innovations, service delivery innovations and manufacturing innovations. I think that the complementarity of these innovations will create the sort of sources of disruption that we need to begin to reach the low level health equilibrium that we have in the health sector.”

PHN’s work is focused on innovation, as they seek to create and scale up the Nigerian Health Innovation Marketplace to identify, nurture and scale up disruptive innovation that can contribute to the government’s ‘Saving a Million Lives Initiative’. The alliance seeks to develop synergies between the needs of the health system and the capabilities of the private sector through partnerships for better mobile health infrastructure, supply chain capabilities and several other needs of the sector. They also help to mobilize the private sector resources to undertake impact investments in the underserved segments of the health sector.



Read more: https://outrepreneurs.com/2017/09/we-must-ensure-innovations-in-the-health-sector-address-real-problems-umar-sadiq/#ixzz4tJYu7CAZ

Technnovation’, entrepreneurship best approach to sustain Nigeria’s economy – NIS

Technological innovations (technnovation) are pivotal for Nigeria to attain her economic goals, particularly when the ecosystem supports entrepreneurship.
This was the unanimous view of panellists at the Nigeria Innovation Summit (NIS) 2017 held in Lagos, recently, conveying a message on the need for the country and Africa in general, to take critical steps that support and leverage the demographical strengths in order to be technologically relevant.

Davis Cook, chief executive officer, Research Institute for Innovation and Sustainability (RIIS), South Africa, speaking on the Summit’s theme,’Transforming Nigeria’s Economy Through Technology, Innovation and Entrprenurship’, urged African start-ups to collaborate to develop solutions to unique challenges faced by the Continent.

He said the multifaceted challenges faced in healthcare, transportation, food safety, commerce and agriculture, should drive willingness among the start-ups to start sharing information on the way forward while aligning in clusters to build solutions.

“We don’t necessarily have to replicate other technologies rather innovate on how to perfect application of these technologies. It is not the job of the world to solve our problems, it is for us to think out how we must solve our issues. Innovations and clusters of hubs are antidotes to impeding ‘digital colonisation’ in Africa,” Cook said.

However, technology and innovation thrive better in a healthy ecosystem, said Mr. Kenneth Omeruo, CEO of Emerging Media, stressing that “Nigeria has human, natural and the financial resources to become a leader in technology and innovation in the comity of nations but we are nowhere to be found even among many African nations”.

This, Omeruo said, is due largely to the fact that government do not truly support or invest in technology and innovation in the country. “The Government is yet to understand its importance as to give it all it takes to create an enabling environment that will naturally attract the needed foreign investments.

“Just to remind us that technology, innovation and entrepreneurship is the only hope for Africa’s survival, and Nigeria should wake up to play a leading role. With emerging technologies like virtual reality, artificial intelligence, robotics, genomics, internet of things (IoT), increased awareness on crytocurrency, cybersecurity, data mining and analysis, it is obvious that the next 20 years within the Fourth Industrial revolution will create a whole new economy and new industries.

Speaking specifically on innovation in healthcare, Dr. Muntaqa Umar-Sadiq, managing director and chief executive officer, Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN), said, though Nigeria’s healthcare sector has received billions in grants, however the inadequacy of current health programs and stagnated results necessitates bold and disruptive innovative approaches to transform the sector.

He said that the state of healthcare sector was characterised by poor outcomes, poor quality and a lack of protection from financial risk which attracted the interest of concerned Nigeria who set up PHN to mobilizes private sector to complement government’s efforts in accelerating improvement in health outcomes by focusing on innovation, impact investments, advocacy and public-private partnerships.

“The sector requires innovations that address socio-economic challenges, such as poverty and health, also drive economic growth,” he said.

Also, Mr. Tony Ajah, director, Nigeria Innovation Summit (NIS), reflected on the 2016 Global Innovation Index, where Nigeria was ranked 114 out of 128 countries based on the investment in research and development, infrastructure, ICTs, political environment, regulatory effectiveness, knowledge and technology output, market sophistication etc.

The Summit agreed that there could be no better time to promote innovation in Nigeria than now as every sector in the country needs disruptive ideas driven by technology and innovation.

PHN Advocates Disruptive Innovations in Nigeria’s Healthcare Sector

Nigeria’s healthcare sector has received billions in grants; however the inadequacy of current health programs and stagnated results necessitates bold and disruptive innovative approaches to transform the sector.

The Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer of Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN) Dr. Muntaqa Umar-Sadiq, made the remark during a presentation at the just concluded Nigeria Innovation Summit (NIS) in Lagos, adding that the epidemiological transition and population growth projected in the country exacerbate the need for scalability of effective innovative approaches within the health sector.

(L-r): Research Institute for Innovation and Sustainability (RIIS), South Africa, Davis Cook; Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer of Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN) Dr. Muntaqa Umar-Sadiq and Executive Director, Nigeria Incubators and Innovators’ Network (NIIE) Bankole Oloruntoba, during a panel session at the Nigeria Innovation Summit (NIS) held in Lagos recently.

He said that the state of health was characterised by poor outcomes, poor quality and a lack of protection from financial risk which attracted the interest of concerned Nigeria who set up PHN to  mobilizes private sector to complement government’s efforts in accelerating improvement in health outcomes by focusing on innovation, impact investments, advocacy and public-private partnerships.

Interventions by PHN, Dr. Umar-Sadiq said have saved at least one million lives of women and children in Nigeria.

“The sector requires innovations that address socio-economic challenges, such as poverty and health, also drive economic growth. In the 70s and 80s, Indonesia had a dependency ratio of about 86.84. Through several interventions focused on reducing the total fertility rate in the country, the dependency ratio reduced to 51.31 in 2010. It is expected that between 1980 and 2020, Indonesia’s dependency ratio will have reduced by 41%. Smaller dependency ratios increases the potential for economic growth (on average a 1 point reduction contributes 0.115% to economic growth). This is due to the fact that there is a higher percentage of the population in the workforce.

“Nigeria started out with a similar dependency ratio as Indonesia in the 1980s. However, our dependency ratio is projected to decrease by only 3% by 2020. This is because we have high infant and child mortality (69/1000 and 128/1000 respectively) and a high total fertility rate (6 children per woman). This limits the opportunity for economic growth. Health innovations centered around infant and child mortality as well as family planning could help Nigeria achieve the same results as Indonesia,” he said.

“Innovations from around the world have addressed similar health system challenges, leading to drastic improvement in quality, efficiency, accessibility and affordability of care.

Dr. Umar-Sadiq while charging startups present at the Summit to plug into the opportunities in the sector, added that, in recent times, a number of African countries have ridden a wave of locally appropriate innovations to accelerate progress in the health related MDGs.

“There has been little traction in harnessing these needed bold innovations in health for the Nigerian health market due to several constraints: visibility, capacity, fragmentation and lack of data.

He made case for startups in the healthcare system, stating that they require visibility; “visibility increases awareness of promising new innovations and approaches to address health challenges. Investors have little visibility on compelling viable health innovations.

“Poor capacity and support system for health innovators – they lack access to capital, business and financial management and basic business startup support / incubation needed to take ideas through to market. Investors and health innovators lack the convergence platforms that create market and technical linkages as well as COPs and scalable platforms for sustainable impact and limited evidence based knowledge products and data to facilitates the development and dissemination of focused insights and new evidence about innovations and their strategies to scale and replicate”.

He said that PHN’s theory of change requires rethinking the way health sector partnerships and innovations are curated for impact. The Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN) led by business leaders in Nigeria including Alhaji Aliko Dangote therefore embraces the need to focus on mobilizing the private sector to advance health outcomes through innovation and partnerships.

The Private Sector Health Alliance led a coalition of partners to create the Nigeria Health Innovation Marketplace (NHIM) focuses on four inter-related core objectives: Identify promising innovations; incubate and create linkages that will enable scale; convergence platform around health innovation and invest for impact in selected opportunities.

NHIM covers a plethora of components including a health innovaton hub, an accelerator program and healthcare challenges and has since curated over 42 innovations through the business development boot camp representing four archetypes of healthcare innovations.

The Nigeria Innovation Summit, a brainchild of Emerging Media, also attracted participants delegates from the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria; Anambra State Government; Kaduna State; Ministry of Industry, Trade and Investment; UNIDO/NIRP; Oxford Business Group; British High Commission; University of Lagos; Federal University of Technology, Owerri; Caleb University; Crescent University; Nasarawa State University; Nuhu Bamalli Polytechnic, Zaria, amongst others.

PHN Advocates Disruptive Innovations in Nigeria’s Healthcare Sector

Nigeria’s healthcare sector has received billions in grants; however the inadequacy of current health programs and stagnated results necessitates bold and disruptive innovative approaches to transform the sector.

The Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer of Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN) Dr. Muntaqa Umar-Sadiq, made the remark during a presentation at the just concluded Nigeria Innovation Summit (NIS) in Lagos, adding that the epidemiological transition and population growth projected in the country exacerbate the need for scalability of effective innovative approaches within the health sector.

He said that the state of health was characterised by poor outcomes, poor quality and a lack of protection from financial risk which attracted the interest of concerned Nigeria who set up PHN to  mobilizes private sector to complement government’s efforts in accelerating improvement in health outcomes by focusing on innovation, impact investments, advocacy and public-private partnerships.

Interventions by PHN, Dr. Umar-Sadiq said have saved at least one million lives of women and children in Nigeria.

“The sector requires innovations that address socio-economic challenges, such as poverty and health, also drive economic growth. In the 70s and 80s, Indonesia had a dependency ratio of about 86.84. Through several interventions focused on reducing the total fertility rate in the country, the dependency ratio reduced to 51.31 in 2010. It is expected that between 1980 and 2020, Indonesia’s dependency ratio will have reduced by 41%. Smaller dependency ratios increases the potential for economic growth (on average a 1 point reduction contributes 0.115% to economic growth). This is due to the fact that there is a higher percentage of the population in the workforce.

“Nigeria started out with a similar dependency ratio as Indonesia in the 1980s. However, our dependency ratio is projected to decrease by only 3% by 2020. This is because we have high infant and child mortality (69/1000 and 128/1000 respectively) and a high total fertility rate (6 children per woman). This limits the opportunity for economic growth. Health innovations centered around infant and child mortality as well as family planning could help Nigeria achieve the same results as Indonesia,” he said.

“Innovations from around the world have addressed similar health system challenges, leading to drastic improvement in quality, efficiency, accessibility and affordability of care.

Dr. Umar-Sadiq while charging startups present at the Summit to plug into the opportunities in the sector, added that, in recent times, a number of African countries have ridden a wave of locally appropriate innovations to accelerate progress in the health related MDGs.

“There has been little traction in harnessing these needed bold innovations in health for the Nigerian health market due to several constraints: visibility, capacity, fragmentation and lack of data.

He made case for startups in the healthcare system, stating that they require visibility; “visibility increases awareness of promising new innovations and approaches to address health challenges. Investors have little visibility on compelling viable health innovations.

“Poor capacity and support system for health innovators – they lack access to capital, business and financial management and basic business startup support / incubation needed to take ideas through to market. Investors and health innovators lack the convergence platforms that create market and technical linkages as well as COPs and scalable platforms for sustainable impact and limited evidence based knowledge products and data to facilitates the development and dissemination of focused insights and new evidence about innovations and their strategies to scale and replicate”.

He said that PHN’s theory of change requires rethinking the way health sector partnerships and innovations are curated for impact. The Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN) led by business leaders in Nigeria including Alhaji Aliko Dangote therefore embraces the need to focus on mobilizing the private sector to advance health outcomes through innovation and partnerships.

The Private Sector Health Alliance led a coalition of partners to create the Nigeria Health Innovation Marketplace (NHIM) focuses on four inter-related core objectives: Identify promising innovations; incubate and create linkages that will enable scale; convergence platform around health innovation and invest for impact in selected opportunities.

NHIM covers a plethora of components including a health innovaton hub, an accelerator program and healthcare challenges and has since curated over 42 innovations through the business development boot camp representing four archetypes of healthcare innovations.

The Nigeria Innovation Summit, a brainchild of Emerging Media, also attracted participants delegates from the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria; Anambra State Government; Kaduna State; Ministry of Industry, Trade and Investment; UNIDO/NIRP; Oxford Business Group; British High Commission; University of Lagos; Federal University of Technology, Owerri; Caleb University; Crescent University; Nasarawa State University; Nuhu Bamalli Polytechnic, Zaria, amongst others.

Source: AP News
PHN Advocates Disruptive Innovations in Nigeria’s Healthcare Sector

Nigeria Innovation Summit: Panelists urge government to review school curriculum

Some panelists at the Nigeria Innovation Summit 2017 on Thursday in Lagos urged government to review school curriculum to reflect modern business environment driven by technology. They said it was time the teaching of students was upgraded from theories to the practical aspects of learning, especially in technology and innovation.

The panelists were discussing the topic: Technology, Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Driving Economic Growth, Building Innovation Ecosystems and Collaborations.

Mr Davis Cook, the Chief Executive Officer, Research Institute for Innovation and Sustainability (RIIS), South Africa, said that there was need for Africans to position themselves to tackle their challenges.

Cook urged Africans not to copy what worked for foreign countries and take it their countries since each country has its own unique technological problem.

“With good political will, and having the right experience and knowledge, Africans can be able to solve their problems.

“Africans have the right demographic power force as regards the youths and there is need to leverage on that force,” he said. 

Mr Muntaqa Umar-Sadiq, the Managing Director, Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria called for innovation in the health sector, saying it would help government to save the lives of its citizens.

“The state of health is characterised by poor outcome, quality and lack of protection from financial risk and so it needs new approaches to investment.

“Despite significant investment, there is nothing to show in the health sector as current health programme are inadequate and people are now focusing outside for health providers “We have leveraged on the efficiencies of communication and produced a health space that can help government to save lives,” he said. Mr Bankole Oloruntoba, a social and business tactics engagement specialist said that structured innovation was a major problem facing the country.

He said that open innovation which had to do with sharing of problems was key to the country’s innovative growth.

He described open innovation as product development, creation of opportunities, increase venture capitalism, saying “all these help to create more jobs’’.

Oloruntoba listed challenges hindering open innovation as unwillingness to adopt to open innovation, risk taking, problem sharing, process change, among others. TheNewsGuru reports that the Nigeria Innovative Summit is an event that brings stakeholders together to share trends and opportunities in the technological innovation sub-sector.